SCP for Businesses

Wagons full of palm oil fruits waiting in front of steamers. Lampung, Sumatra, Indonesia. © Alain Compost / WWF

The way we produce, trade, consume and waste presents huge threats to the natural world. We are demanding more resources than the Earth can provide, contributing to climate change, water scarcity, pollution, and biodiversity loss. But, as the global population grows further, business as usual will accelerate this destruction.

In the private sector, there is growing understanding of the need to develop sustainable supply chains and move towards low-carbon development, but there are still many questions about how to do this and what the costs involved will be. WWF’s SCP project is working together with producers and companies of the food value chain to integrate SCP principles into their business strategies.

The aim is to help business partners gain knowledge on the economic, social and environmental benefits of SCP, so that they will integrate SCP principles into their business practices. This can be done through the development of stakeholder roundtables for pre-competitive discussions on SCP, best case development, training farmers, working with the finance sector on sustainable investment tools and strategies, support closing gaps in scientific research, and promoting voluntary agreement schemes such as certification, etc.

WWF tools for company engagement

“Our aim is to shift markets to be more sustainable and drive positive change.”
– Kavita Prakash-Mani, WWF Markets Practice Leader @wwfleadmarket

The way we produce, trade, consume and waste presents huge threats to the natural world. Our economies are geared towards continuous growth and rely on people buying more stuff. We’re already demanding more resources than the Earth can provide, contributing to climate change, water scarcity, pollution, and biodiversity loss. But, as the global population grows further, business as usual will accelerate this destruction.

Water stewardship is about business understanding the risks they face from water scarcity and pollution, and taking action to help ensure water is managed sustainably as a shared, public resource. Stewardship goes beyond being an efficient water user. It is about the private sector collaborating with governments, other businesses, NGOs, communities, and others to protect shared freshwater resources. WWF is helping redefine the role of the private sector in advocating, supporting and promoting better basin governance for the benefit of people and nature.

Tackling water-related risks to business is becoming increasingly urgent. The UN has predicted a 40% global shortage in water supply by 2030, while the World Economic Forum has ranked water as one of the top global risks for the past six years.Launched in 2012, the Water Risk Filter has developed into a leading and trusted tool to help companies across the world assess their water risk.

WWF works with companies to increase the sustainability of their supply chains in order to reduce impacts on priority places and species. The Supply Risk Analysis helps companies understand environmental and social risks in the places where commodities are produced—especially in those places that WWF cares about most.

Download WWF Guide “Making the business case for sustainable commodities. A guide to good practice” (2016)